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Camesovy 315 / 433.92 MHz Wireless Receiver Board Module AK-RXB12

SKU:A1485000AT

If you are search for a wireless receiver module, here is the right place for you! With our good reputation and service you will be happy with it!This wireless and high frequency receiver module is RXB12 with high-sensitivity reaching 107dBm of ultra...
Retail Price:
USD$ 8.78
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Quantity 2-78-1920-49≥50
Price USD$ 6.25USD$ 5.57USD$ 4.88USD$ 3.97
 
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Specifications:


  • Operating Voltage: DC 2.7 - 5V
  • Transfer Rate: 4.80KBPS
  • Quiescent Current: 6mA
  • Receiver Sensitivity: -107dBm
  • Size: 30 x 9 x 5mm / 1.2 x 0.4 x 0.2in
  • Operating Temperature: -20 ℃ - +85 ℃
  • Frequency: 315MHZ - 433.92MHZ
  • Color: Orange

Features: 



  • With high sensitivity and high anti-interfere, the wireless module will have a stable performance
  • This receiver board is designed with ultra-small size and ASK receive mode
  • Wireless design of the module is convenient to use
  • With fine workmanship, the receiver module is durable to use
  • This kind of wireless receiver module can be applied to car alarm, security, learning machines, intelligent home, garage door/automatic barrier, central locking, electric curtains, industrial control, etc
  • The wireless receiver module is easy and convenient to install without any further external components

Details:


Camesovy 315 / 433.92 MHz Wireless Receiver Board Module AK-RXB12


  • The receiver module with bright color is convenient to use

Camesovy 315 / 433.92 MHz Wireless Receiver Board Module AK-RXB12


  • Another side of the receiver module is also made fine workmanship so that it looks perfect 

Camesovy 315 / 433.92 MHz Wireless Receiver Board Module AK-RXB12


  • Long pin design to the wireless receiver module can be easily installed

Camesovy 315 / 433.92 MHz Wireless Receiver Board Module AK-RXB12


  • It has the features of stable performance with high sensitivity, anti-interfere and quality

Camesovy 315 / 433.92 MHz Wireless Receiver Board Module AK-RXB12


  • The wireless module is widely applied in anti-theft system and remote control system, so that it is hot in market 

How Do Remote Controls Work?


Camesovy 315 / 433.92 MHz Wireless Receiver Board Module AK-RXB12


  • Generally, there are two types of remote controls: infrared (IR), and radio frequency (RF). Infrared remote controls work by sending pulses of infrared light to a device, while RF remote controls use radio waves in much the same way. Pragmatically, the biggest difference between the two is range. IR remote controls require a clear line of sight to the receiving device and their range maxes out at about 30 feet (9.14 meters). RF remote controls can go through walls and around corners, with a range of roughly 100 feet (30.48 meters)
  • Most home entertainment components such as stereos, televisions and home entertainment centers use IR remote controls. The remote contains an internal circuit board, processor, and one or two Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)
  • When you push a button on a remote control, it transmits a corresponding code to the receiving device by way of LED infrared pulses. The idea is somewhat akin to flashing an SOS signal, but instead of letters, the flashing LED light is transmitting a series of 1s and 0s. The "1" might be represented by a long flash, while "0," a short flash. A receiver, built into the component, receives the pulses of light and a processor decodes the flashes into the digital bits required to activate the function
  • Along with the desired function, remote controls must also piggyback other data. Firstly, they transmit the code for the device they are controlling. This lets the IR receiver in the component know that the IR signals it is picking up are intended for it. It essentially tells the component to start listening. The function data follows, capped by a stop command to tell the IR device go back into passive mode
  • Some remote controls can be very finicky, requiring the user point the remote directly at the component. This is due to a weak transmitter. Changing the batteries can help, but if the transmitter itself is poor, pulses are transmitted in a narrow beam. More robust IR transmitters, and remote controls with double LEDs, transmit broader beams that allow the user to point the remote in the general direction of the transmitter
  • Sometimes it happens that a recliner or favorite spot on the couch does not have a clear line-of-sight to the entertainment center or television. Often a coffee table or some other object is in the way. When this happens we find ourselves raising an arm, trying to control the object "around" the device. This can get quite annoying, but there's an easy alternative
  • Since light bounces off objects it is sometimes more convenient to point remote controls towards a flanking wall or even the ceiling to change a channel or send a function command. The light will bounce off the surface of the wall or ceiling and scatter. If you bounce it at an advantageous angle, the scattering light will reach the component. Often it's easiest, with elbow resting on an armrest, to flip your wrist back and point the remote up at a wall behind you. This can work quite well, even though the remote is pointing in the exact opposite direction of the component. Once you find the easiest sweet spots around the room from which to bounce your signal, you can use these instead of struggling with trying to get around your obstructed line of sight
  • Garage door openers, alarm systems, key fobs and radio-controlled toys use RF remote controls. RF remote controls work essentially the same as IR remote controls, except they use radio waves. As stated, radio waves can also penetrate walls and go around objects and corners, making RF arguably more convenient than IR
  • Some high-end entertainment systems come with RF remote controls for expanded remote range. There are also IR-to-RF remote control converters that allow IR remote controls to extend their range through utilizing a RF translator that basically acts as a middleman. The RF converter relays the IR signal in RF waves to get it further. The converter on the component side reverts the RF signal back to IR so the component can understand it
  • Most home entertainment components such as stereos, televisions and home entertainment centers use IR remote controls. The remote contains an internal circuit board, processor, and one or two Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)
  • When you push a button on a remote control, it transmits a corresponding code to the receiving device by way of LED infrared pulses. The idea is somewhat akin to flashing an SOS signal, but instead of letters, the flashing LED light is transmitting a series of 1s and 0s. The "1" might be represented by a long flash, while "0," a short flash. A receiver, built into the component, receives the pulses of light and a processor decodes the flashes into the digital bits required to activate the function
  • Along with the desired function, remote controls must also piggyback other data. Firstly, they transmit the code for the device they are controlling. This lets the IR receiver in the component know that the IR signals it is picking up are intended for it. It essentially tells the component to start listening. The function data follows, capped by a stop command to tell the IR device go back into passive mode
  • Some remote controls can be very finicky, requiring the user point the remote directly at the component. This is due to a weak transmitter. Changing the batteries can help, but if the transmitter itself is poor, pulses are transmitted in a narrow beam. More robust IR transmitters, and remote controls with double LEDs, transmit broader beams that allow the user to point the remote in the general direction of the transmitter
  • Sometimes it happens that a recliner or favorite spot on the couch does not have a clear line-of-sight to the entertainment center or television. Often a coffee table or some other object is in the way. When this happens we find ourselves raising an arm, trying to control the object "around" the device. This can get quite annoying, but there's an easy alternative
  • Since light bounces off objects it is sometimes more convenient to point remote controls towards a flanking wall or even the ceiling to change a channel or send a function command. The light will bounce off the surface of the wall or ceiling and scatter. If you bounce it at an advantageous angle, the scattering light will reach the component. Often it's easiest, with elbow resting on an armrest, to flip your wrist back and point the remote up at a wall behind you. This can work quite well, even though the remote is pointing in the exact opposite direction of the component. Once you find the easiest sweet spots around the room from which to bounce your signal, you can use these instead of struggling with trying to get around your obstructed line of sight
  • Garage door openers, alarm systems, key fobs and radio-controlled toys use RF remote controls. RF remote controls work essentially the same as IR remote controls, except they use radio waves. As stated, radio waves can also penetrate walls and go around objects and corners, making RF arguably more convenient than IR
  • Some high-end entertainment systems come with RF remote controls for expanded remote range. There are also IR-to-RF remote control converters that allow IR remote controls to extend their range through utilizing a RF translator that basically acts as a middleman. The RF converter relays the IR signal in RF waves to get it further. The converter on the component side reverts the RF signal back to IR so the component can understand it

What Is a Wireless Module?

Camesovy 315 / 433.92 MHz Wireless Receiver Board Module AK-RXB12

A wireless module is a piece of separate, portable software or hardware with the capability of functioning with various systems wirelessly


Function

Wireless modules are used primarily as add-ons for electronic devices. They can be used to amplify audio for your home theater system, provide wireless Internet, as additional memory storage for your home computer or even to automate your home lighting


Types

You can find wireless modules in all shapes and sizes. They vary depending on the company producing them and the function they perform


Considerations

Wireless modules can be an inexpensive and convenient way to optimize or upgrade your hardware without the hassle of wires. For example, you can set up a wireless audio amplifier that collects sound from your home theater system and amplifies it throughout the room


Package Included:


  • 1 x Receiver Module