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MASSA MASSA 67mm Soft Focus Effect Diffuser Lens Filter


What you are viewing is a MASSA 67mm Soft Focus Effect Diffuser Lens Filter, to have better photography experience, this camera diffuser lens filter comes to be a must have for you!The 67mm diffuser lens filter is ideal to soften and link the as...
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  • Works with the objectives of 67mm
  • Optical glass filter
  • Entourage black mat
  • Great for photos portrait and landscape
  • The 67mm diffuser lens filter will not affect contours of your photographs but will diffuse a light allowing a general effect softening
  • This is an original product
  • Size: 67mm/2.64in(Dia.)


MASSA MASSA 67mm Soft Focus Effect Diffuser Lens Filter

  • The 67mm diffuser lens filter is great for photos portrait and landscape

MASSA MASSA 67mm Soft Focus Effect Diffuser Lens Filter

MASSA MASSA 67mm Soft Focus Effect Diffuser Lens Filter

  • The 67mm diffuser lens filter works with the objectives of 67mm

MASSA MASSA 67mm Soft Focus Effect Diffuser Lens Filter

  • Well packaged, the camera diffuser lens filter comes in good condition to you

What's the Camera Lens Filters:

  • Camera lens filters still have many uses in digital photography, and should be an important part of any photographer's camera bag. These can include polarizing filters to reduce glare and improve saturation, or simple UV/haze filters to provide extra protection for the front of your lens

Lens Filter Type:

  • The most commonly used filters for digital photography include polarizing (linear/circular), UV/haze, neutral density, graduated neutral density and warming/cooling or color filters
  • Example uses for each are listed below:

Filter Type

Primary Use

Common Subject Matter

Linear & Circular Polarizers

Reduce Glare Improve Saturation

Sky / Water / Foliage in Landscape Photography

Neutral Density (ND)

Extend Exposure Time

Waterfalls, Rivers
under bright light

Graduated Neutral Density (GND)

Control Strong Light Gradients Reduce Vignetting

Dramatically Lit Landscapes

UV / Haze

Improve Clarity with Film Provide Lens Protection


Warming / Cooling

Change White Balance

Landscapes, Underwater, Special Lighting

Linear & Circular Polarizing Filters:

  • Polarizing filters (aka "polarizers") are perhaps the most important of any filter for landscape photography. They work by reducing the amount of reflected light that passes to your camera's sensor. Similar to polarizing sunglasses, polarizers will make skies appear deeper blue, will reduce glare and reflections off of water and other surfaces, and will reduce the contrast between land and sky

MASSA MASSA 67mm Soft Focus Effect Diffuser Lens Filter

  • Note how the sky becomes a much darker blue, and how the foliage/rocks acquire slightly more color saturation. The intensity of the polarizing effect can be varied by slowly rotating your polarizing filter, although no more than 180° of rotation is needed, since beyond this the possible intensities repeat. Use your camera's viewfinder (or rear LCD screen) to view the effect as you rotate the polarizing filter.The polarizing effect may also increase or decrease substantially depending on the direction your camera is pointed and the position of the sun in the sky. The effect is strongest when your camera is aimed in a direction which is perpendicular to the direction of the sun's incoming light. This means that if the sun is directly overhead, the polarizing effect will be greatest near the horizon in all directions
  • However, polarizing filters should be used with caution because they may adversely affect the photo. Polarizers dramatically reduce the amount of light reaching the camera's sensor-often by 2-3 f-stops (1/4 to 1/8 the amount of light). This means that the risk of a blurred handheld image goes up dramatically, and may make some action shots prohibitive
  • Additionally, using a polarizer on a wide angle lens can produce an uneven or unrealistic looking sky which visibly darkens. In the example to the left, the sky could be considered unusually uneven and too dark at the top

MASSA MASSA 67mm Soft Focus Effect Diffuser Lens Filter

  • Linear vs. Circular Polarizing Filters: The circular polarizing variety is designed so that the camera's metering and autofocus systems can still function. Linear polarizers are much less expensive, but cannot be used with cameras that have through-the-lens (TTL) metering and autofocus-meaning nearly all digital SLR cameras. One could of course forego metering and autofocus, but that is rarely desirable

Problems with Lens Filters:

  • Filters should only be used when necessary because they can also adversely affect the image. Since they effectively introduce an additional piece of glass between your camera's sensor and the subject, they have the potential to reduce image quality. This usually comes in the form of either a slight color tint, a reduction in local or overall image contrast, or ghosting and increased lens flare caused by light inadvertently reflecting off the inside of the filter
  • Filters may also introduce physical vignetting (light fall-off or blackening at the edges of the image) if their opaque edge gets in the way of light entering the lens (right example). This was created by stacking a polarizing filter on top of a UV filter while also using a wide angle lens-causing the edges of the outermost filter to get in the way of the image. Stacking filters therefore has the potential to make all of the above problems much worse

MASSA MASSA 67mm Soft Focus Effect Diffuser Lens Filter

Note on Choosing a Filter Size for a Camera Lens:

  • Lens filters generally come in two varieties: screw-on and front filters. Front filters are more flexible because they can be used on virtually any lens diameter, however these may also be more cumbersome to use since they may need to be held in front of the lens. On the other hand, filter holder kits are available that can improve this process. Screw-on filters can provide an air-tight seal when needed for protection, and cannot accidentally move relative to the lens during composure. The main disadvantage is that a given screw-on filter will only work with a specific lens size
  • The size of a screw-on filter is expressed in terms of its diameter, which corresponds to the diameter usually listed on the top or front of your camera lens. This diameter is listed in millimeters and usually ranges from about 46 to 82 mm for digital SLR cameras. Step-up or step-down adapters can enable a given filter size to be used on a lens with a smaller or larger diameter, respectively. However, step-down filter adapters may introduce substantial vignetting (since the filter may block light at the edges of the lens), whereas step-up adapters mean that your filter is much larger (and potentially more cumbersome) than is required
  • The height of the filter edges may also be important. Ultra-thin and other special filters are designed so that they can be used on wide angle lenses without vignetting. On the other hand, these may also be much more expensive and often do not have threads on the outside to accept another filter (or sometimes even the lens cap)

Package Included:

  • 1 x MASSA 67mm Soft Focus Effect Diffuser Lens Filter
  • 1 x Solid Plastic Box