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39inch 6 Strings Round Acoustic Guitar Musical Instrument


This elegant Maple Acoustic Guitar Musical Instrument is attention to everyone. The best part about it is that this Maple Acoustic Guitar Musical Instrument plays as good as it looks, with low action and 21 frets, this is the perfect Cheap Maple...
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USD$ 174.78
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  • Overview


  • Accurate intonation and low action for easy beginning play
  • Sound, beauty and design were all blended together when this guitar was created
  • Accurate intonation and low action make it a perfect first maple acoustic guitar musical instrument for kids
  • The high gloss white finish gives this beautiful sounding guitar musical instrument an elegant look as well
  • Makes an excellent gift idea
  • A truly stunning piece of work
  • Fret: 21
  • Panel Materials: Spruce
  • Black Material: Maple
  • Fingerboard Material: Rosewood
  • Size: 99cm/39in(Length)


39inch 6 Strings Round Acoustic Guitar Musical Instrument

39inch 6 Strings Round Acoustic Guitar Musical Instrument

39inch 6 Strings Round Acoustic Guitar Musical Instrument

  • Enjoy crystal-clear sound on the stage or in the studio with this guitar

How to Tune an Acoustic Guitar:

  • The pitch that a guitar string produces is extremely sensitive to changes in the environment, especially when using multiple tunings. A guitar must be tuned at least once before every playing session and more often with hard, aggressive playing
  • Tune an acoustic guitar to itself. This method was commonly used before tuners were widely available and simply assumes that a string (usually the highest) is already in tune. Each string is fretted at the location that should produce the same pitch as the next highest string when unfretted
  • Use the method given in Step 1 to tune a guitar to the standard EADGBE tuning. We assume that the high E string is already tuned correctly. Tune the B string so it has the same pitch at the fifth fret as the open E string does. Repeat this process for the rest of the strings being sure to use the fourth fret when tuning the G string to the open B string
  • Employ a basic battery-powered tuner. This type of tuner is specifically designed for a particular guitar tuning sequence (usually EADGBE). Turn the tuner on and place it as close as possible to the sound hole. Play each open string in turn and tune the string until the indicator shows the string is in tune
  • Obtain a chromatic tuner for alternate tunings. These tuners can tune to every note in the chromatic scale and do not require the guitar to use a specific tuning
  • Play the harmonic at the 12th fret for increased accuracy in tuning. You can obtain a pure tone that is one octave above the fundamental note by plucking the open string while a finger is resting lightly against it

Acoustic Guitar History

The Acoustic guitar is essentially a descendant of the Classical guitar, which, in its current form, has been around for over 100 years. The main difference between the Classical and Acoustic guitars are that one is strung with nylon strings, while the other is strung with steel strings. Since the Acoustic guitar is strung with steel strings, it has a louder, brighter sound which is appealing to folk and blues players

Another difference between the Acoustic and Classical guitars is that the Acoustic guitar has a bigger body size, stronger structure, and a narrower neck than does the Classical guitar. The structure of the Acoustic guitar is stronger so that it can withstand the immense tension placed on it by the heavier steel strings

Acoustic-Electric guitars haven't been in existence for nearly the amount of time that their Acoustic counterparts have. These guitars, which have the ability to be both plugged into an amp and played unplugged, have been around for roughly 70 years

All about the Acoustic guitar

The bodies of cheap Acoustic guitars are typically made from laminated tonewood. More expensive Acoustics are made from higher cuts of solid spruce top wood on an Acoustic guitar, the material which the body is made from really matters, so those looking for a rich sound will want to choose a guitar with a body made from nicer wood such as spruce top wood

The neck of the acoustic guitar is usually made from maple, mahogany, or rosewood. However, some guitar necks are comprised of different woods. Yet again, the quality of wood does matter. Generally speaking, Acoustic guitars with necks made of a high quality maple or mahogany and bodies made with solid spruce top are quality guitars with great tone

The vibration of the strings is amplified by the soundhole of the guitar. This is where all sound that you hear comes from

If you look inside the soundhole of the acoustic guitar, you'll see the construction of the body. There are braces and linings, all essential to keeping the guitar intact and playable. X-bracing, a strong, durable bracing, is typically used on Acoustic guitars because it is heavy and strong enough to withstand the pressure of steel strings

On the body of the guitar, you'll find the bridge. This is where one end of the strings goes. The strings are inserted into the little holes and the bridge pegs hold them there

On the neck of the Acoustic guitar is the fretboard. Most fretboards on the Acoustic guitar are made of rosewood or ebony. More expensive Acoustic guitars have fretboards made of higher quality woods

The headstock of the Acoustic guitar features six tuning pegs (three on each side of the headstock) and six tuners (three on each side of the headstock). Good Acoustic guitars will have die-cast Grover tuners which usually stay in tune longer than other brands of tuners

Like their Electric counterparts, Acoustic guitars are tuned in the standard E A D G B E tuning. Most Acoustic guitars have six strings, while some have twelve. If you are curious as to the difference between the two, check out our article on "Twelve string vs. Six string"

The Acoustic guitar still remains a very popular instrument. It is used in virtually every style of music,rock, pop, country, blues, you name it. Acoustic guitars are wonderful instruments for both beginners and professionals

Acoustic Guitar Parts

39inch 6 Strings Round Acoustic Guitar Musical Instrument


  • There are three main sections zoomed in the picture; the Headstock, the Neck, and the Body. The headstock holds the Tuner Posts around which the strings are wrapped and terminated. The Tuners are knobs that increase or decrease the tension on the string wrapped around the tuner posts (tuning the sound made by the strings). Note that some accoustic guitars may have different looking tuners, and some may even have all six tuner keys on the same side. Even though they may look different, they work in the same manner. The Nut guides the strings to the tuner posts and maintains the height of the strings
  • The length of the Neck depends on the scale of the guitar and the number of frets it has. The back of the neck could be "C" shaped, or "V" shaped (sideways < if you compare it to the letter C). The front of the neck is the Fingerboard or Fretboard, that maybe contains the Frets embedded in notches along its surface. The Strings run down the neck over the frets. The height of the strings over the frets is called the Action; if the action is too high the strings are harder to press down, if the action is too low the strings may rattle against the frets muffling the notes. The neck usually has "dot" markers on the top and the side facing the player, showing the position of the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 12th (which has two dots) and 15th fret
  • On standard acoustic guitars, the large body makes it difficult to use any frets above the 12th fret. Some guitars have a Cutaway section to allow your hands to reach the 14th fret easily, however this does affect the sound as it disrupts the shape of the guitar. You strum (or pick) the strings over the Soundhole, which is where the vibrations from the strings are acoustically reflected out providing the sound from the instrument. Acoustic-electric guitars have an Pickup inside the soundhole, note that you can also buy add-on acoustic pickups and turn any acoustic guitar into an acoustic-electric. Most acoustic guitars have a Pick Guard, that protects the finish on the top of the guitar body from mis-directed picking. The strings terminate in the Saddle which is glued onto the top of the guitar body. The Bridge raises the strings and establishes the Action of the guitar. Note most acoustic guitars have "fixed" bridges, the only way to lower the action is to shave or cut down the saddle (or replace the bridge) - there is no way raise the action. Some newer models provide adjustable bridges simliar to electric guitars
  • Note that as an acoustic guitar ages, a pronounced "belly" or bump will appear on the top of the body, just below the saddle. Since the strings are constantly pulling on the saddle, over time and with humidity changes the wood will begin to bow where the pressure is being applied. There are "ribs" or "struts" inside the body to prevent the saddle from being ripped out, so a small belly is perfectly normal as the guitar is broken in. If the belly gets too large you will have to have the ribs inside the top repaired, they may have popped out or broken. Many musicians claim the belly improves the sound of the guitar, which may contribute to the theory that acoustic guitars sound better as they grow older

Package Included:

  • 1 x Guitar
  • 1 x Guitar Bag
  • 1 x Strap
  • 1 x Plectrums