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EM 58mm +3 Macro Close-Up Lens Filter for Digital Camera

SKU:A1275000JX

Are you searching for such camera lens filter for enhance your photography's quality? High quality optical glass is used in the manufacture of these 58mm lens filter to meet the high resolution requirements of today digital cameras.High quality optic...
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Specifications:


  • 58mm Macro Close-Up +3 camera lens filter for lens
  • Every camera has a limitation of the minimum distance for shooting the picture
  • That means you cannot go closer to the object more than the distance recommended by the manufacturer
  • With close up cameras filter you can come closer to your object without actually coming closer to the object and you enjoy the closest possible image of your choice
  • Fit SLR camera / digital camera / camcorder DV with a 58mm diameter lens
  • Made of aluminum alloy & optical glass
  • Size: 58mm / 2.3in(Dia.)

Details:


EM 58mm +3 Macro Close-Up Lens Filter for Digital Camera


  • Capture more vivid details of the object to your photography with this amazing camera lens filter

EM 58mm +3 Macro Close-Up Lens Filter for Digital Camera


  • Alloy structure of this 58mm lens filter more durability for outdoor photograph, easy to use and maintenance

EM 58mm +3 Macro Close-Up Lens Filter for Digital Camera


  • Add some artistic affects to your photography with this 58mm Close-up camera lens filter

EM 58mm +3 Macro Close-Up Lens Filter for Digital Camera 


  • High quality optical glass is used in the manufacture of these 58mm camera lens filter to meet the high resolution requirements of today digital cameras

Size in Detail:

EM 58mm +3 Macro Close-Up Lens Filter for Digital Camera

What's the Camera Lens Filters:


  • Camera lens filters still have many uses in digital photography, and should be an important part of any photographer's camera bag. These can include polarizing filters to reduce glare and improve saturation, or simple UV/haze filters to provide extra protection for the front of your lens

Lens Filter Type:


  • The most commonly used filters for digital photography include polarizing (linear/circular), UV/haze, neutral density, graduated neutral density and warming/cooling or color filters
  • Example uses for each are listed below:

Filter Type


Primary Use


Common Subject Matter


Linear & Circular Polarizers


Reduce Glare Improve Saturation


Sky / Water / Foliage in Landscape Photography


Neutral Density (ND)


Extend Exposure Time


Waterfalls, Rivers
under bright light


Graduated Neutral Density (GND)


Control Strong Light Gradients Reduce Vignetting


Dramatically Lit Landscapes


UV / Haze


Improve Clarity with Film Provide Lens Protection


Any


Warming / Cooling


Change White Balance


Landscapes, Underwater, Special Lighting



  • UV Filters - Absorb ultraviolet rays and cuts through far-off atmospheric haze. UV filters also serve as protection for your lens, so it is recommended that you keep them on at all times. UV filters have no drastic image enhancing effect, other than cutting through haze.
  • Sky Filters - Reduce blushiness in outdoor shots, especially in shade under a clear sky. Another function of sky filters is that they keep skin tones free of reflections from near objects (such as trees)
  • Polarizers - Polarizers come in two varieties, Circular Polarizers (CPL) or Linear Polarizers (PL). Generally, linear polarizers are best for manual focus cameras, and circular polarizers are best for autofocus. The reason for this is that with a linear polarizer, many autofocus and metering systems have problems focusing or metering light. When light rays reflect off of a surface, they become polarized. Polarizing filters allow you to basically select which of these light rays you want to allow to pass through. Polarizing filters allow you to remove reflections from any non-metallic surface, such as glass, water, granite countertops, etc. They also increase clarity and vibrance of colors, and drastically improve the appearance of a blue sky. By increasing the contrast between the sky and clouds, and darkening the blue of the sky, they make for some very vivid sky shots

EM 58mm +3 Macro Close-Up Lens Filter for Digital Camera


  • Differences in sky tones and contrast when using a polarizing filter. Left is without a filter, right is with a polarizer

EM 58mm +3 Macro Close-Up Lens Filter for Digital Camera


  • Reflection reducing effect that a polarizer has on water. Left side is minimal effect (selected by rotating the polarizer), and the right side is maximum effect
  • Neutral Density Filters - Neutral Density (ND) filters are commonly ignored by photographers, but actually have several uses and can help you achieve otherwise unobtainable effects. ND filters work by creating a reduction in light that is neutral amd equal for the sensor area. Some of the uses for ND filters are to decrease depth of field, effectively allowing larger apertures to be used, allowing better seperation of subject and background. They also allow slower shutter speeds (which would normally cause over-exposure) to be used to record movement in subjects such as moving cars, waterfalls, etc. Graduated Neutral Density (GND) filters are neutran density filters which vary the effect with a gradient, which can be helpful when the differences between the highlights and shadows in a scene are too great to be able to properly expose both. ND-2 filters will absorb 1 f-stop of light, ND4 will absorb 2 f-stops, and ND-8 will absorb 3 f-stops

EM 58mm +3 Macro Close-Up Lens Filter for Digital Camera


  • Comparison showing the effects of both ND4 and ND8 filters on higher exposure and larger aperture
  • Star Filters - Star filters, also known as cross screen filters, create a star pattern with lines that radiate from very bright objects, such as lights or reflections of the sun. The number of stars which a filter produces as well as the number of points each star has, varies depending on the filter. Most star filters will be marked as '8 point', '6 point', '4 point', etc. which denotes the number of points each star has

EM 58mm +3 Macro Close-Up Lens Filter for Digital Camera


  • Comparison between Tiffen star filters
  • IR Filters - Infrared filters allow only infrared light to pass through, blocking all visible light
  • Intensifying Filters - Filters which intensify one particular color. May be used to make the sky or grass more vibrant, etc
  • Diffusion Filters - Diffusion filters give a very 'soft' feel to shots, great for portrait work, in which they are very good at hiding blemishes and uneven surfaces
  • Duto Filters - Duto filters work somewhat like diffusion filters, but leave the center of the image very sharp while giving the edges a soft feel. Great for portrait work and professional photography
  • Portrait Filters - Portrait filters reduce yellows and oranges but enhance pinks, making skin tones more vivid and clear
  • Fluorescent Filters - Fluorescent (FL) filters correct the greenish-yellow tone that fluorescent lighting gives off

Usage:


  • Smoothing water movement in waterfalls, rivers, oceans, etc.
  • Achieving a shallower depth of field in very bright light
  • Reducing diffraction (which reduces sharpness) by enabling a larger aperture
  • Making moving objects less apparent or not visible (such as people or cars)
  • Introducing blur to convey motion with moving subjects
  • photo with a smoothed water effect from a long exposure
  • However, only use ND filters when absolutely necessary because they effectively discard light-which could otherwise be used to enable a shorter shutter speed (to freeze action), a smaller aperture (for depth of field) or a lower ISO setting (to reduce image noise). Additionally, some ND filters can add a very slight color cast to the image.
  • Generally no more than a few f-stops is need for most waterfall scenarios, so most photographers just keep one or two different ND filter amounts on hand. Extreme light reduction can enable very long exposures even during broad daylight

Problems with Lens Filters:


  • Filters should only be used when necessary because they can also adversely affect the image. Since they effectively introduce an additional piece of glass between your camera's sensor and the subject, they have the potential to reduce image quality. This usually comes in the form of either a slight color tint, a reduction in local or overall image contrast, or ghosting and increased lens flare caused by light inadvertently reflecting off the inside of the filter
  • Filters may also introduce physical vignetting (light fall-off or blackening at the edges of the image) if their opaque edge gets in the way of light entering the lens (right example). This was created by stacking a polarizing filter on top of a UV filter while also using a wide angle lens-causing the edges of the outermost filter to get in the way of the image. Stacking filters therefore has the potential to make all of the above problems much worse

EM 58mm +3 Macro Close-Up Lens Filter for Digital Camera

Note on Choosing a Filter Size for a Camera Lens:


  • Lens filters generally come in two varieties: screw-on and front filters. Front filters are more flexible because they can be used on virtually any lens diameter, however these may also be more cumbersome to use since they may need to be held in front of the lens. On the other hand, filter holder kits are available that can improve this process. Screw-on filters can provide an air-tight seal when needed for protection, and cannot accidentally move relative to the lens during composure. The main disadvantage is that a given screw-on filter will only work with a specific lens size
  • The size of a screw-on filter is expressed in terms of its diameter, which corresponds to the diameter usually listed on the top or front of your camera lens. This diameter is listed in millimeters and usually ranges from about 46 to 82 mm for digital SLR cameras. Step-up or step-down adapters can enable a given filter size to be used on a lens with a smaller or larger diameter, respectively. However, step-down filter adapters may introduce substantial vignetting (since the filter may block light at the edges of the lens), whereas step-up adapters mean that your filter is much larger (and potentially more cumbersome) than is required
  • The height of the filter edges may also be important. Ultra-thin and other special filters are designed so that they can be used on wide angle lenses without vignetting. On the other hand, these may also be much more expensive and often do not have threads on the outside to accept another filter (or sometimes even the lens cap)

Package Included:


  • 1 x 58mm Macro Close-Up +3 Filter